Menu
Log in
Log in

Who am I?

Monday, April 29, 2013 23:39 | Luis Casillas

Greetings Community,

Who am I? In order to understand who I am, we must understand the Domain of the Brain concept; please go to page six of the following link so that you may follow along with a visual representation of the Domain of the Brain: http://wherecommunitiesserveveterans.org/resources/Documents/ORIENTATION%20MODELS.pdf. Each box represents a different phase in our thought process. From the moment we wake up in the morning we're in the "C" box, from there we decide to the shower, I hope, and we go into the "B" box. We get to work or into our daily routine and we step into the "I" box. In the "I" box we are inundated with information. After we process that information, we get into the "R" box. In the "R" box we create relationships, and from those relationships we create transactions. After we create our transactions we step into the "A" box. Now, for most it’s not easy stepping outside the "A" box. Stepping outside the "A" Box consists of stepping into the "L" box. In the "L" box, phase, we are learning new ways to get back to the "A" box, and shortly after, you step into the "U" box. In the "U" phase we un-learn what we have learned, in order to learn what we don’t know. We then go into the "R" box where we re-train. Many get comfortable in one box, never completing their cycle. Now that you have an idea of what the Domain of the Brain concept consists of, lets go back to my question, who am I?

At this point in my career, I consider myself to be in the "U" box. I’m un-learning in order to learn what I don’t know. Since I’ve been out of the Marine Corps I’ve realized that the business tempo has shifted into high gear. With information flowing at the speed of light, we have become more efficient. With the right knowledge and technology we are able to complete tasks, twice as fast, now, than 10 years ago. Before joining the Marine Corps, in 2006, I was cold calling to build my prospect list. Now, what began as a past time has become the norm, in the business world; various social media sites are now the go to place to start a network. A resume is nice, but a good reference can seal the deal; what I mean by that is that, if we treat everyone like our first client the word will get out, faster than ever.

Who are You?

Luis Casillas

Comments

  • Tuesday, April 30, 2013 22:16 | Rosa Chiapas
    Luis, I wanted to say that I wish you much success. It's good to see a young man not only with goals, but plans to achieve them.

    Rosa
    Link  •  Reply
    • Wednesday, May 01, 2013 19:15 | Luis Casillas
      Rosa,

      Thank you for your thoughts. Everything I do is possible because of the people around me. All the Positivity has encouraged me to move forward and all the negativity has influenced me to change. I look forward to reading your thoughts as I progress, in the community. Remember, positive thoughts are encouraging and negative ones cause change; change is good. With that said feel free to speak your mind.

      Welcome to the community,
      Luis
      Link  •  Reply
  • Monday, May 06, 2013 07:21 | Luis Casillas
    Greetings Community,

    The domain of the brain cycle is one that we constantly cycle through during the day. This concept is very powerful and necessary for business professionals. For the most part if we make business decisions based on emotions, they have a high probability to end horribly wrong. By grasping the domain of the brain concept we are able to understand our thought process and make intellectual decisions based on facts.

    Continued Success,
    Luis
    Link  •  Reply
  • Monday, May 06, 2013 11:51 | jonathan lara
    Luis, one’s self-introduction is one of the most important pieces of networking. The way in which you have presented yourself is very unique and caught my attention. The Domain of the Brain concept is now new to me, but in just your short introduction you have made me learn. I look forward to hearing more about your interests, goals, and skills.

    Jon
    Link  •  Reply
    • Tuesday, May 07, 2013 07:38 | Luis Casillas
      Jon,

      Thank you for your service, and the time you have taken to share your thoughts. The Domain of the Brain concept allows us to understand our thought process and therefore make smart decisions. We are inundated with so much information that we tend to miss out certain details. Since our discharge from the service, we’ve shared a great deal of information (“I”). This information has strength our relationship (“R”). The community, you, and I have benefited from this information by obtaining our earned benefits (“T”). Please share you're experience before and after you obtained your VA Card.

      Keep the flow of information running and invite others to join the fun!

      Your old friend and fellow Veteran,
      Luis
      Link  •  Reply
  • Monday, May 06, 2013 18:59 | JUANA CHIAPAS
    Hi Luis,

    In reading your introduction you got me thinking how we all at some point or another tend to get comfortable in a "box" and by doing so we interfere with our growth and success. We definitely need to step back sometimes and unlearn things to allow us to move forward, I found your presentation interesting and thought provoking. You definitely are on the right track to reaching you goals

    I wish you much success!
    Juana
    Link  •  Reply
    • Tuesday, May 07, 2013 09:39 | Luis Casillas
      Juana,

      Great observation, our development is based on new actions which then cause new reactions. It’s like they say, “you can’t do the same thing over and over and expect a different reaction.” Therefore, if we practice the Domain of the Brain concept on a constant basis our growth is limit less. By learning (“L”), unlearning (“U”) and re-learning (“R”), we constantly refine our skills. It’s like they say in the service, “training never ends.”

      I know you will become a great asset to your company, and I have no doubt that you’re going to go through this process. Be ready to take in all the information (“I”), create relationships (“R”), make transactions (“T”), and become an A player (“A”). I know you won’t get complacent and follow through the cycle.

      Your Veteran,
      Luis
      Link  •  Reply
  • Thursday, May 09, 2013 09:34 | Luis Casillas
    Greetings Community,

    Yesterday, I had the pleasure to meet with Ignacio G. Romero, he is the Veteran’s Affairs Liaison for Congressman Mark Takano. From the moment he stepped into the SWVBRC, I was thinking Domain of the Brain. After introductions we moved right into the (“I”) box; I began by finding out what his role was as a Veteran’s Affairs Liaison. I learned a lot about the congressional inquiry process and how they have assisted Veterans in the past. After he shared his information, I spoke to him about our center, and how the knowledge we harvest has helped guide our Veterans. The process of sharing information created our relationship (“R”). Needless to say he became a member of our community (“T”). Although, we spoke a lot about how we may build our strategic relationship, to better guide our Veterans in their transition to civilian life, we missed out on a topic which is the part of the core values of the SWVBRC.

    Now, taking myself out of the A player mentality (“A”), remembering what I learned (“L”), then disinvesting it (“U”); I should have spent more time on the overall picture ("R"). Veterans are important to our community, not only because they have a great deal of knowledge and skills but because in the end the beneficiaries of an informed Veteran community is the Veteran’s local community. No other demographic of individuals enjoy the benefits we have earned. On average Veterans with a VA card contribute $10,000 a year in a direct and in-direct fashion to their local communities’ economy.

    I retract my previous statement; I can’t say I’m in one box in particular. In order to stay on top of my game, I must constantly cycle through the Domain of the Brain.

    Your Learner,
    Luis
    Link  •  Reply
  • Thursday, May 09, 2013 11:59 | Rocio Casillas
    Mi amor te felicito , tienes una muy buenas manera de ver nuestra realidad ..hoy en dia hay muchas personas que no saben ni donde estan parados? ni que quieren realmente para su vida ..pero aqui se ve muy claro que sabes lo que haces y quieres seguir aprendiendo mas porque asi es esta vida nacimos para aprender, y hoy en dia hay muchas maneras y tu eres un gran ejemplo para mi porque aprovechas cada minuto de tu tiempo!!
    Link  •  Reply
    • Thursday, May 09, 2013 14:19 | Luis Casillas
      Amor,

      Gracias por tu apoyo. Es importante para nuestra familia de aprender como podemos ser major dia a dia. Mis desisones simper comiensan con el bien estar Santi y Ustd. Aun que aveces sea dificil, emocional mente, siempre tenemos que tomar desiciones que sea pa lo major de nuestra union.

      Con mucho Amor,
      Tu viejito!
      Link  •  Reply
  • Friday, May 10, 2013 13:41 | Luis Casillas
    Who am I? You tell me…

    I joined the Marine Corps for many reasons, two of them where, to get some adventure in my life, and not get arrested for it, second, to take advantage of the G.I. Bill. The Marine Corps was a great experience. What I enjoyed most about the Corps where the people I met; I always say, “I met the best and the worst America has to offer.” I must admit I was disappointed with a few events I experienced as a Marine.

    One event went a little something like this, as I was getting close to my end of active service, all of a sudden I was the bad guy. Mind you, my record book is as clean as the day I stood above the Yellow foot prints, not one page 11. I got back from Iraq and I transferred to the Marine Corps Administrative Analysis Team, there I finished my last year of active duty. I was transferred there because the Career Retention Specialist thought it would be a good fit and would motivate me to stay in, good initiative bad judgment. After I get there, I meet the Staff Non-Commissioned Officer in Charge of my new unit, who happened to be a former recruiter and was set to retire one year after my end of active service. With that said, you could just imagine everything he tried to keep me in, not necessarily because he thought I was a good Marine, but because he didn’t want to deal with a new clerk his last year of service. I know this because he decided to go home early on my going away. Why do I bring this up?

    The Marine Corps is built to keep good Marines in, so when I decided to go against the current, all of a sudden, I became a bad Marine.

    Is it fair to outcast a person who wants to follow his own dreams?

    This country was built by dreamers!

    Back to the subject at hand, who cares who I think I am, who do you think I am?

    If I'm a bad guy for wanting to live my dream then I don't care to be good!!
    Luis
    Link  •  Reply
    • Friday, May 10, 2013 16:43 | Luis Casillas
      With that said, I invite everyone to join in my DREAM!! Where you can be who you want to be.
      Link  •  Reply
  • Monday, May 13, 2013 15:59 | Joel Pablo
    Who are you? We ask our friends, family and even ourselves that question in various stages of our life. We are constantly assessing ourselves and reexamining what defines, what concepts/ideas that define us and all other aspects of our lives that define us. We can not truly identify one specific area that defines us, however when we mix it in one large bowl we are then amazed. All the ingredients in one bowl make up one person that may just include the bad and the good. What we continue to make of this bowl is up to us. We can pour in something to enhance it or we can pour something in to damage it. You are the deciding factor in what goes into that bowl. Let it be good and bring happiness to your soul.

    Joel Pablo
    Link  •  Reply
    • Monday, May 13, 2013 16:42 | Luis Casillas
      Joel,

      Thank you for your service and your thoughts. I like your analogy of your bowl, although some ingredients by them selves may have a bad taste, but when mixed with others they synthesize, thus forming a delicious recipe. I agree happiness is a great ingredient to have but sometimes those sour ones like anger are the driving force behind real change.

      Have you experienced a time when a negative event caused you to change?

      Your fellow Veteran,
      Luis
      Link  •  Reply
  • Monday, May 13, 2013 16:30 | Luis Casillas
    My dream,

    I have never felt comfortable asking for money. So, when I was a 6th grade student, at A street elementary, in Perris, CA, I was never too fond of the cafeteria food. That negativity sparked my entrepreneurial spirit, and I began contemplating ways to make some extra snack money. This concept of negativity being the power behind new ideas is one I learned in my orientation.

    Consider an old, school, science project, when you had a battery and used it to light up a bulb. If not for the negative, from the battery the flow of electrons would not be possible. A lot of the times life is the same way. We don’t tend to change unless a negative event occurred or we reached a certain level of frustration.
    For me, I wanted what a 13 year old would consider tastier food.

    So my idea was to buy cheap Mexican candy, south of the boarder and sell it to the kids at school. It worked out great, I was able to make a profit and eat all the junk food my fat little heart desired.

    My wonder years!
    Luis
    Link  •  Reply
  • Wednesday, May 15, 2013 18:57 | Luis Casillas
    Greetings community,
    A fast forward to where my dream has taken me, I recently began my Bachelor of Science in Accounting and would like to ask the community what is their conception of the cold war. If I may have at least three people to answer the following questions:

    1. What words or phrases come to mind when you think of the term Cold War?

    2. Did you ever study the Cold War in school? If so, what are some aspects of the Cold War that you remember?

    3. Who were the parties involved in the Cold War?

    4. Can you name any key events that we mainly associate with the Cold War?

    Continued Success,
    Luis
    Link  •  Reply
  • Thursday, May 16, 2013 16:36 | Neftaly Longoria
    Luis,

    I just want to wish you the best of luck in all of your success. I have no doubt that you will do great things in anything you put focus on. You are truly a great person and friend and can't wait until we meet again. If you ever need anything you know who you can call.
    Link  •  Reply
    • Friday, May 17, 2013 06:13 | Luis Casillas
      Neftaly,

      Thank you for your service and your encouraging thoughts. Longo, your post has given me a moment of clarity; It had me reflecting on our experience in Iraq, which then lead me to recall the creditability, Image/Brand, concept, from my orientation. Who am I?

      I’m a Marine, I’m a Volunteer, Secretary, for the Southwest Veterans’ Business Resource Center, I’m an Intern at TheARRC.com, I’m a Realtor, and a committed entrepreneur, with an A.A.S in Accounting.

      I invite you to join me in my dream and follow my progression. I only ask that you keep posting, for its thanks to your thoughts and those of our community that inspire me. Feel free to invite others to join us.

      Your Brother in arms, friend and Learner,
      Luis
      Link  •  Reply
  • Sunday, May 19, 2013 11:18 | rosa c perez
    Hi Luis,

    After understanding the brain concept,i can easily say I'm an "A" and sometimes a "B",but as i think about the two I'm too comfortable being where I am, and i can't say I love it .As I have witnessed in my life plenty of times staying in your comfort zone leaves you in 1 place for a really long time and most of the time we are not the happiest, doing things outside the box ,for the most part, can lead you to bigger & better things! Saying that I wanted to thank you for guiding me through all the time spent working on my immigration status ,Thanks to who you are and what you know. I'm very pleased to take on the challenge of moving forward in life and applying myself in whatever comes my way with more confidence.
    Link  •  Reply
    • Sunday, May 19, 2013 12:39 | Luis Casillas
      Rosa,

      Thank you for your time and thoughts. After receiving your residency status you should feel like and “A” player. You have worked hard and earned your diploma and right to be in this country. Although you were not born here you are definitely part of the American dream. Having been a part of your immigration process and see the confidence in your eyes to pursue your own dreams is the most rewarding feeling in the world, events like those are the reason why I’m proud to be a Marine and a citizen of this great Nation.

      I served for dreamers like you!

      Luis
      Link  •  Reply
    • Monday, May 20, 2013 09:53 | Luis Casillas
      Rosa,

      I would like to briefly mention that your earned your residency through the Dream Act. The Dream act is one step further towards your citizenship. In order for you to obtain your citizenship you must obtain a college degree or serve in the U.S. Military for 2 years. Here is a link where you may find more information:

      http://dreamact.info/

      If you have any questions feel free to post it on my blog. The reason I invite you to share your questions is so to help other dreamers like you.

      Luis
      Link  •  Reply
  • Sunday, May 19, 2013 11:32 | hugo casillas
    Thanks to your domain of the brain concept i realized what stage I'm at in life. im to comfortable in my own little box to try anything new or different there for i know now its time for a change.thanks for taking the time to show me this amazing concept on the domain of the brain which i will be using everday from here on out. Best of luck!
    Link  •  Reply
    • Sunday, May 19, 2013 12:48 | Luis Casillas
      Bro,

      There’s a saying in the Corps, “complacency kills.” You should not box yourself in; life will try and do that to us on its own. Always go through the cycle and remind yourself of who you are and who you want to be. You have a lot of dreams; you just need to work on your plan.

      Your Brother,
      Luis
      Link  •  Reply
  • Sunday, August 25, 2013 22:18 | Luis Casillas
    I would like to thank everyone for volunteering your thoughts and taking the time to advance my transition.

    Thank you!
    Luis
    Link  •  Reply
DOD Welcome home-small.jpg

A welcoming home for our Troops.

Welcoming home our men and women doesn't end after the crowd disperses, it MUST continue on for the life of the Veteran! They've served us, now we will serve them with programs that work so they reintegrate into society.

We are a national public benefit nonprofit organization that educates American Communities about best practices to serve Veterans.  We honor their service by empowering Veterans to apply their training and skills to successfully transition to productive careers and enterprises.

We provide free vocational training 24/7 to all of our members through our website, in addition to local events.  We believe the tenet that American Communities are the ultimate beneficiaries when Veterans claim their benefits and invest in productive endeavors.

The SWVBRC enlists the support of members of local Communities like you to increase Veteran awareness of the value of obtaining a VA card and receiving earned benefits.

Sponsorships, donations, volunteers and support from communities like yours enable us to reach out to Veterans and empower them to transition back into successful, productive enterprises that ultimately benefit all Americans and support future generations.

Subscribe to our Newsletter


Subscribe

The Internal Revenue Service has determined that Southwest Veterans' Business Resource Center, Inc. is an organization exempt from federal income tax under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. A donation to SWVBRC, Inc. is deductible to the extent permitted under law.

© 2008 - 2016 Southwest Veterans' Business Resource Center, Inc.

 Privacy Policy

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, any copyrighted work is posted under fair use without profit or payment as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and/or research.

Contact Us
Designed by The ARRC® & Powered by Wild Apricot.

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software